Wisconsin landscape photography

New Work by Jim Sincock

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Before the snow and deep freeze hit, I was out photographing at the Nicholson Wildlife Refuge in Caledonia, Wisconsin. The unusual amounts of rain we had over the summer, and through the fall, really changed the landscape there. The water in this scene had been an old road grade which was part of the hiking trail in past years. This year it seems it is more of a canoe trail!

Since moving back to Wisconsin five years ago, I have watched certain areas turn into wetlands, and in the case I watched the existing wetland expand.

I am pleased with the way this image turned out, especially once I worked my contemporary Pictorialism magic on it.

Secret Paths by Jim Sincock

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I love waking up to a nice sunrise, but sometimes I enjoy a foggy morning even more. Earlier this week we had a nice foggy morning and I grabbed my camera gear and headed out to River Bend Nature Center in Racine. I managed to photograph for over an hour before the sun broke through the fog and before the mosquitoes came out in force.

This image is perhaps still a work in progress since I am still working on getting the right feel. Iā€™m using my Pictorialist style on the image to further enhance the dream-like feel I felt while out photographing that morning.

Woodland at River Bend by Jim Sincock

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I've always been drawn to the sometimes chaotic scenes in nature. Complex and layered scenes which become an abstraction when viewed more intimately than the larger surrounding landscape. I'm not even sure if they would be called landscapes, since these images remove the sense of location. With landscape photography, I've found that many people feel compelled to ask "where is that?" while with these images location is somewhat irrelevant. Images like these are subtle yet extremely complex. 

Photographing scenes like these can be a daunting task. How does one make sense of a scene which is heavily overgrown and seemingly missing an obvious composition? And when you do find a composition that works for your eye, how do you make a final print which will convey the scene as you saw it in your mind's eye? 

I had begun to figure out how to make sense of these scenes in black and white, and now with my new color work I am learning the complexities which come with the range of color and subtleties. I prefer overcast flat light or foggy days when photographing these scenes because the contrast of hard sunlight doesn't fit the mood or vision I have for these scenes. In creating a final print which fits my vision, I draw my my extensive knowledge of custom printing in the traditional wet darkroom. 

This series will be ongoing, yet I hope to exhibit a portion of the work in 2018. Prints will also be available from my other site, www.jimsincockphotography.com

The Best Camera Is.... by Jim Sincock

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As the saying goes, the best camera is the one you have with you. Which was definitely the case today when I decided to take the long way home so I could drive past the lake after being in the the studio all day. 

Have I mentioned that I'm enjoying color photography again? Yes, I am!

Untended Landscapes by Jim Sincock

The grand landscapes or intimate details of landscapes are often fairly easy to photograph since it is often more obvious how to compose the image. Chaotic views of the landscape tend to be harder to photograph and share their story. A tangled mess of trees and shrubs can be both visually interesting while at the same time visually confusing. When you add black and white to that mix your image may become more abstract and harder to read.

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